Category Archives: General

Anything that doesn’t really fit anywhere else…

Control Google Privacy

It’s no secret at this point that Google is a data hoarding hamster, but some realize this after using their services for months, years and even decades. And lets be frank here, Google may offer controls for privacy, but they dug the controls deep into their settings where most users won’t even find or look for them. And no one can really audit if they do anything for real or how much of the data they already sold to 3rd parties and blocking or removing it makes any difference at this point.

But still, there are controls for it and you can use them to at least feel better in worst case scenario lol. Some panels may interleave or share parts of controls, but I’ve listed them anyway for faster direct access.

VIEW AND DOWNLOAD ALL YOUR DATA

Download ALL your data from Google

BASIC GOOGLE CONTROLS

Google Dashboard

Your Google Personal Info

PRIVACY CONTROLS

Google Privacy Controls

Google Privacy Checkup

GOOGLE ACTIVITY

Google MyActivity

Google Activity Control

3RD PARTY APPS WITH ACCESS TO GOOGLE SERVICES

Google Connected Apps

DELETE GOOGLE SERVICES / DATA

Delete individual Google products IRREVERSIBLE!

Delete Google Account IRREVERSIBLE!

I also suggest you sweep through all panels and look at every setting in there and decide whether you want them enabled or not. Also, be aware that controlling activity settings will also affect how their products work. For example, if you disable Youtube Watched Activity, Youtube won’t track what videos you’ve watched (at all) and it also won’t remember where you stopped watching videos if you stop watching them half way through.

What is also a bit worrying is the fact there is ZERO controls for GMail in particular, a service/product which stores by far the most of your personal data.

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Good riddance Twitter

After the bullshit for which they locked my account and having to bitch for days for fuckers to unlock it without giving them my phone number to “verify” me, I’ve decided I’m done with bullshit “social” platforms like Twitter. I was basically waiting to get access back to my own damn account so I can terminate it on my terms and not just leaving it “locked”. I didn’t miss it for several days or was it 2 weeks already, I don’t know or care, but I have no wish sticking around platform that’s clearly biased leftist muslim loving fuckery. Good riddance Twitter, you won’t be missed and your stupid spineless practices led me to dumping it.

I’m returning back to good old e-mail communication and Gab.ai. A free speech Twitter alternative where you are in control over what you see and what you don’t want to see, not some blue haired latte sipping idiot who gets offended on your or someone else’s behalf. On Gab I don’t have to worry about getting my account locked because I expressed an opinion someone found “problematic”.

I’ll write more about Gab in the future…

Susana’s Press Play Radio

PressPlayRadio_By_Susana.jpg

I’ve been listening to Susana for years now, ever since I first heard her voice in one of Armin van Buuren mixes and simply fell in love with her powerful vocals. There are many vocalists in the world, but not many are like her. Have been following her work through years when she was still hosting V2V show which unfortunately ended (and I never managed to archive all the mixes), but she continued with Press Play Radio show which puts even more emphasis on amazing vocals in trance and vocal trance genre. Thanks to her mixes, I’ve discovered many other amazing vocalists within this genre. I think her mixes are amazing way to promote these vocalists. Most of them can be found on Beatport where you can buy their music and support them as well. Best way to consume Press Play Radio mixes is to create a playlist with all the tracks in your favorite music player and set it to randomized repeat loop. I can listen to it like this for days and never get tired of it!

I’ll always upload Press Play Radio mixes to MEGA Archive the moment they become available.

Press Play Radio

Press Play Radio is a monthly music show hosted by incredibly talented vocalist Susana every first Sunday of the month at 20:00 CET on 1.FM Amsterdam Trance Radio channel. But if you can’t listen to it live or you fancy listening to Press Play Radio mixes at a later time, you can check them out below…

Listen/download Press Play Radio archive

Press Play Radio on SoundCloud

Press Play Radio on iTunes

If you for whatever reason cannot download Press Play Radio mix of your choice from above links, use my Press Play Radio Archive on MEGA.

Press Play Radio MEGA Archive
Decryption key for MEGA Archive: !Cz8QWNcH6aBraifQiramEA
Decryption key is used separately to prevent direct hotlinking due to limited bandwidth.

Press Play Radio Tracks Lists

Discover other artists from Press Play Radio mixes

Support Susana

If you like Susana’s music and you want to support her, follow her on social media and consider buying her music on Beatport.

Disclaimer

This is not a paid promotion, I just really like her music and vocals and I want to share her work with the world (as well as work of other musicians included within the mixes). All Press Play Radio continuous mixes are available for download as MP3 free of charge by Susana herself, I’m just hosting a MEGA Archive so her work won’t ever get lost (also SoundCloud is often funky and tracks can’t be downloaded reliably). For any copyright or licensing concerns, please contact Susana directly as she is selecting the tracks and hosting the Press Play Radio show as well as providing the downloads.

Adding custom AdBlock filter lists to Opera browser

As you might know already, Opera comes with integrated AdBlock for quite a while. And it’s generally very fast because it’s an integral part of the rendering engine in this browser. It also comes with widely used EasyList and EasyPrivacy out of the box as well as with NoCoin protection from cryptocurrency mining scripts that can abuse CPU usage during visits on certain webpages. But there are a lot more out there that you can use to filter out of webpages…

How to do it?

OperaCustomFiltersScreenshot.png

 

 

What lists to use?

Most widely used ones are from EasyList and Fanboy. EasyList and EasyPrivacy are already included in Opera out of the box, so you basically only need Fanboy’s lists as an extra.

https://www.fanboy.co.nz/

My favorites are Annoyances List (which includes blocking of social widgets and cookie messages), Anti-Facebook List and Enhanced Trackers List (which also includes Problematic Websites List).

Read the descriptions of lists well because some already contain the others and you don’t want to unnecessarily duplicate them as it will just make browsing slower with no other benefits.

This way I filter out all the nonsense and tracking garbage from websites without using a single extra extension.

How to use the lists?

To use the list, just go to Fanboy’s webpage, right click on “View List” link and “Copy link address”. Paste it in the “Add a site” field and press ENTER. It’ll import the list and it will also regularly auto update on its own.

Congrats! You’ve just removed bunch of nonsense from webpages you visit, keeping them clean and without social networks that track you everywhere you go.

Farewell Firefox, hello to Opera

I’ve been a long time user of Firefox browser and I absolutely loved its flexibility, modularity and just that openness to cool features. A lot of time has passed since apparently, because Mozilla’s philosophy seems to have lost its ways entirely. With every month and every release, it’s becoming more like a clone of Chrome. And not in a good way. First they copied its basic skin/theme, then they copied the start page and then they copied their retarded last tab closing (which I’ve ranted about in my last blog post), now they are going with the clumsy and restricted add-ons (extensions). And recently, what really placed that cherry on top, the GPU blacklisting which rendered my old laptop entirely useless. It took me ages to even figure it out, because at first, I thought Windows was causing this and then that older Radeon drivers are causing this and then I realized at one point Mozilla just blatantly decided to blacklist my AMD E-450 APU’s GPU so everything runs in software. And runs like shit because it’s not hardware accelerated.

Transition to (through) Chrome

Then, I’ve switched to Chrome for a while. It’s basically Firefox anyway since that one copied half of it. I could also easily ignore the GPU blacklist via chrome://flags panel (they seem to just blindly share this stupid GPU blacklist), allowing my AMD E-450 to accelerate Youtube and webpage rendering again. And it’s working perfectly for 2 months now. No lockups, no crashes, no problems what so ever, I have no clue why the fuck they are blacklisting this GPU and probably many more). But what bothers me with Chrome is that you need like 15 extensions for various stupid little things just to make it half usable and when you have so many extensions, it’s really a bloated hog and a lot of functions still don’t work well because they can’t be done better with clumsy restricted extensions system they have. And their Android version of Chrome si rather clumsy as well.

Hello Opera

And that’s when I (again) resorted back to Opera. My favorite browser back from the days when it was still running the Presto engine and it’s absolutely crazy configurable interface. Opera has since also switched to Chrome’s engine, but with one big difference. It has a lot of goodies already integrated. I don’t need extra extensions for adblocking, mouse gestures, last tab behavior is the way it should be in all browsers, it has a basic RSS reader. I basically need 2-3 extensions and I’m ready. Opera still has few traditional Scandinavian idiocies, but seeing the direction it’s slowly heading, I think they’ll improve that. Where Chrome and Firefox are just an entirely lost cause. They both live in its echo chamber of what they think it’s brilliant and they basically do zero useful innovations.

Opera on the other hand is currently a champion in innovation and it kinda surprises me it is not gaining higher user share. It has integrated Adblocker which is super fast since it works on browser engine level, it has integrated mouse gestures which I can’t live without anymore, has a decent RSS reader, extra Battery saving feature which comes in handy on portable devices where battery autonomy matters, it has a video pop-out feature which works on all major webpages like Youtube, Twitter and Netflix, so you can have a tiny video frame on top of browser, allowing you to browse other webpages while watching that video in the corner. Is the only browser which comes with portable install option in the original installer and even updates itself when in portable mode. Something Chrome just has no clue how to do it (Firefox does though). Bookmarks manager is also good and having it accessible from a sidebar is also nice. Maybe not as flexible as Firefox’s fixed bookmarks “browser” as a sidebar, but close enough. Everything just works so nicely and requires minimal number of extensions, I’m now sticking with Opera and I’m loving it. And the Android browser is also brilliant. With adblocking and compression, it’s saving my tiny data plan and it’s just so fast and functional. And has an EXIT button so you can close it entirely. Unlike Chrome which tends to consume quite some battery when just in the background.

So, all in all, Opera has come a VERY long way since initial terrible versions of their “modern” Chrome based browser. Back then and till few versions back actually, I couldn’t stand it. But something changed with recent Opera 45 build when it received the black sidebar. I lose few 10 pixels of webpage width, but it’s just so usable that I actually want it there. I’ve now also started making recommendations and ideas in their Wishlist section and maybe things will change into absolute perfection. We’ll see.

Yeah, Mozilla’s constant urge to copy everything Google does cost them a user. I don’t play any significance as single user, but it explains why they have been losing users for quite a while. They stopped being innovative and unique. And I think the GPU blacklisting nonsense cost them users as well. When perfectly capable device all of a sudden stutters on all webpages and can’t even play 480p video smoothly on Youtube, people will try something else. And while Chrome and Opera use the exact same GPU blacklist, Microsoft Edge doesn’t. Everything runs hyper smooth on it out of the box even on GPU that is blacklisted by others. Which could explain why people are switching to Edge. I personally don’t like it because it’s clumsy and has no options to customize, but browsing smoothness can explain why people might like it.

When Opera switched to Chromium foundations, I never thought I’d be using it again. It was just such dramatic shift from super configurable Opera 12 to super clumsy and limited Chromium, but I guess they are heading the right direction and their work is slowly starting to pay off. There is also Vivaldi which is made by few original Opera developers, but it’s still in way too early phase for me. But Opera isn’t. So, if you happen to dislike Chrome and Firefox, give Opera a try. I was pleasantly surprised.

AMD Ryzen post-release thoughts and explanations

amd_ryzen_logo

Ok, I’ve talked about few things regarding AMD Ryzen processors in my last article, I’m going to expand it a bit further with this one, explaining few things that people are concerned over or are raging about, be it justly or unjustly…

Games performance

I kinda forgot about this since Intel was dominating the market for so long, but Youtuber and hardware geek JayZTwoCents reminded me of this. It’s the processor specific optimization of games and why current games perform worse on AMD Ryzen processors even though it clearly has identical IPC (Instructions Per Clock) capability. Partially it’s clock fault because Intel’s quad cores simply come clocked way higher which is favored in games, but mostly, it’s processor specific optimization. Intel pretty much dominated gaming segment for 5 years. That’s eternity in PC segment. And with that, all game studios kinda focused on optimizing games for Intel processors only. Now that AMD is back in the game, things will change again. I don’t expect AMD to dominate the field, but you can be assured they’ll at least get on the same fair level as Intel with upcoming games. Some studios might even optimize current games to better support Ryzen.

Memory (RAM) issues

People complaining about memory issues a lot and complaining how AMD dares to release new platform with such issues, not realizing it’s not AMD’s fault. At least not entirely. Sure, they need to work with motherboard makers to ensure everything is in check with their memory controller inside CPU, but from there on, it’s up to motherboard makers to add RAM profiles, enhance compatibility and deliver all that in form of BIOS updates. Considering AMD Ryzen is an all new architecture with all new memory controller, expecting such monumental release to be problem free is really silly thing to do. When Intel released triple and quad channel boards after years of having dual channels around, they were problematic as well. And they still are today and I know that from first hand experience as I owned both, triple (X58) and now quad channel (X99) setup. With BIOS updates, AMD and motherboard makers will solve compatibility issues when it comes to memory. Also, be aware that if you want absolute compatibility, you have to strictly follow QVL lists provided by board makers. They can only assure rock solid performance and stability with memory modules listed there.

Limited AMD Ryzen overclock capability

I’ve seen quite a lot of people whining how bad AMD overclocks. But all these people are leaving out one super important difference. They are taking overclocking capability of freaking QUAD cores and applying it to EIGHT core processors. That’s not how things work and they never will.

If we look at Intel Core i7 6900k, same core configuration as AMD Ryzen R7 1800X, it also peaks at around 4GHz. Anything over that and you need huge amounts of extra voltage and you’ll also get huge thermal footprint from it because of that. You have to understand it has 4 more physical cores and 8 more threads. This essentially means it’ll require twice as much power and output twice as much heat. It’s not that simple and linear, but for better understanding, that’s what it is. So, you can’t compare a overclocking capability of a freaking quad core to an actual octa core. It would just make no sense.

We can however judge AMD when they release hexa and quad cores. But there is also one more factor. AMD Ryzen was designed on manufacturing process that is called LPP. And LPP stands for Low Power Process. CPU’s designed in such way are bound to be very power efficient, but very stubborn when it comes to high clocks. And that’s the way AMD designed Ryzen. Things may change in the future as they will refine and adapt the manufacturing processes.

Power consumption

I’ve heard about complaints on Amazon about AMD Ryzen power consumption and how it’s clearly not just 95W…

Well, we have to first establish two things. How is TDP (Thermal Design Power) measured and more importantly, where (or more precisely, at which processor clock).

Intel for example measures TDP at processor base clock (which for 6900k is at 3.2GHz). And they measure it as average value and not maximum value. It is yet uncertain how AMD measures it for new Ryzen processors. At least I wasn’t able to find any info on that where Intel clearly states how they measure it on their ARC page.

AMD_Ryzen_Power_Chart.jpg

Now, lets take a look at this chart. I’ll focus on two processors to make an example, measured wattages are at wall socket, so understand that (this is not just CPU; this is power draw for whole system). One is Intel Core i7 6700k, a quad core processor with 8 threads (4c/8t configuration) and the other one is AMD Ryzen R7 1800X. The power draw is almost the same, but R7 1800X features twice as many cores and threads. And it’s not just games where it might depend based on actual cores utilization where games usually use just 4. It’s the same in AIDA64 and Handbrake, which both use 100% of all cores. AMD Ryzen has basically done twice as much work on twice as many cores and still delivered same power consumption at the wall socket. This means, regardless of TDP numbers, it’s a pretty damn efficient CPU. It even draws significantly less power than very similarly configured Core i7 6900k. For the number of cores and threads, Ryzen are pretty damn power efficient processors.

The AMD Ryzen paradox

AMD_Ryzen_Logo.png

Yesterday, me and my cousin were looking at the new AMD Ryzen offerings to see what were the options for his PC build. And what I realized about Ryzen is a bit “shocking”. Well, not quite. There is no denying AMD did great with AMD Ryzen. They really pushed IPC (Instructions Per Clock) capability on par with Intel offerings. A lot of people were skeptical about it, but AMD has in fact delivered. And at what price point! Giving users the compute power of most expensive Intel CPU, the Core i7 6900k at a half the price is an offer that’s very hard to refuse. But if you’re a gamer, things change quite a bit…

The gamer factor

There is just one issue with it and that’s the “gamer” factor. If you’re building a gaming system that will 95% of the time run games and the rest of 5% will be browsing and watching movies, there is an issue with AMD Ryzen offerings. At least as things stand now with only R7 1700 and R7 1800 models being available. And that issue is the raw core clock.

AMD Ryzen, all of the currently available don’t clock above 4GHz. Getting it to 4.1GHz 100% stable overclock is a very good achievement, meaning these CPU’s will never be as good as any higher clocked Intel CPU’s, regardless of core count (unless we venture into Core i3 with 2 cores and 4 threads territory).

If you look at the tests, in every single one of them, 6700k and 7700k have an edge in gaming. A quite significant one. They only have 4 cores and 8 threads, but they come at 4.2GHz and 4.5GHz out of the box when boosting. And most of them overclock to at least 4.5GHz base clock easily. At a current cost of 380€ for the 7700k. R7 1700X goes at only around 4GHz and a price tag of 460€. 80€ difference is quite significant and you’re not even having the most optimal gaming setup if you buy R7 1700X.

The aging X99 becomes an alternative

If you look it it differently, the old Core i7 5820k goes for 450€ and 6800k at 470€ respectively). But you can almost be assured it’ll clock up to 4.5GHz rather easily. Yes, X99 motherboards are a bit more expensive at around 200€ if you look at a bit better ones, but you’ll get a 6 core, 12 threads CPU that also clocks high, meaning you’ll not only beat R7 1700X in gaming, but you’ll also beat 7700k when it comes to compute power because you’ll just have more cores and threads. Meaning you’ll kinda get the best of both worlds, but for the price of R7 1700X.

Buyer recommendation

  • Workstation/compute intensive workloads

If you’re aiming at a capable workstation or a PC meant for everything but gaming, AMD Ryzen CPU’s are a formidable competition. At 460€, R7 1700X will beat everything Intel can offer at the moment unless it’s a highly clock dependent single threaded workload. And with R7 1800X, it beats Intel even in the highest end territory with basically half the cost and same performance. If workstation or compute “cluster” is your target system, AMD Ryzen will shine.

  • Blend of intense gaming and regular high compute intensive workloads

If you’re one of those people who love to play games, but they also do some serious work regularly in terms of video encoding, file compression, software 3D rendering, it might be worth checking old Intel LGA2011v3 parts, 5820k and slightly newer 6800k in particular. With capability to overclock relatively high and offer 6 physical cores and 12 threads, they offer a nice blend of gaming and compute capability for a price of R7 1700X. You kinda get best of both worlds with few tiny compromises.

  • Gaming

As things stand at the moment without the R5 and R3 offerings, if you’re 100% dedicated gamer, going with Core i7 7700k seems to be the only logical decision at the moment. As much as I absolutely love what AMD achieved with AMD Ryzen compared to how bland Bulldozer CPU’s were, it’s just no match for raw core clock offered by 7700k. Don’t get me wrong, you’ll still be very much able to play all games using maximum settings without issues, but you just won’t be getting 100% optimal gaming performance from it. The future of heavily multi-threaded games is still very uncertain so it’s hard to predict how Ryzen R7 CPU’s will fare in the future.

  • Gaming on a budged

If you’re a pure gamer at heart, but you’re wallet doesn’t allow you to go bananas on high performance  PC components, I think waiting for AMD Ryzen R5 and R3 is a good plan. You can read below why I think so.

The future

AMD_Ryzen_Processors_List.png

Now, if we look at the AMD Ryzen list of CPU’s that are still not released, but are planned, the most interesting gamer CPU will in fact not be R7 1700X as initially anticipated, but rather R5 1600X, R5 1400X and to my surprise, even R3 1200X. They are all clocked relatively high, they all come with 4+ physical cores as standard (opposed to Intel Core i3 with only 2 cores) and if there aren’t other limiting factors within the core design, they should be capable of overclocking higher. You’ll be less limited thermally and fewer core CPU’s have always overclocked higher in general. And at those price points, even if I include USD to EUR conversion and VAT, I think they’ll be pretty darn competitive.

In fact, the best looking gaming AMD Ryzen CPU seems to be R5 1400X. Out of all lower end models, it’s clocked the highest, meaning it’ll perform the best in current games and it still comes with 4 cores and 8 threads. It’ll be an affordable pocket rocket.

Verdict

What AMD did with their latest Ryzen CPU is nothing short of amazing. Great CPU for hard to beat price. But there are quite few very significant factors that you have to consider before buying/assembling new system at the moment. At first I also thought we’ll just throw R7 1700X into system for my cousin and call it a day, but in the end, it turned out things aren’t that simple. His configuration will fall into the “Gaming” category above and it’s actually really hard to decide. Should I use R7 1700X and risk high performance decline over time if games don’t go heavy multi-threaded in the near future or should I go with 7700k and risk heavy performance decline if games in fact do go heavy multi-threaded. I actually still don’t have a clear cut answer for this, but think we’re either leaning towards 7700k or waiting for R5 1400X. Which sorts of backs up my findings and explanations above.